USFWS

SCA CDIP Intern Geovanni Salgado at a US Fish and Wildlife Service refuge

USFWS

Are you passionate about wildlife? Ever considered turning that passion into a career? SCA internships with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offer opportunities to work directly an indirectly with wild animals—from sea turtles to salmon, bats to butterflies, avocets to albatrosses—restoring their habitats, monitoring their numbers, sharing their stories with the public, and more. If you want to learn the ins and outs of wildlife conservation, and contribute meaningfully to the preservation of wildlife and wildlife habitat, an SCA internship with USFWS in the place to begin.  

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employs over 9,000 people to manage 150 million acres of land spread across over 551 National Wildlife Refuges and thousands of smaller sites all over the country. Interning through SCA is a perfect way to get involved with the agency and decide if a career in wildlife management is the right thing for you.

We post new positions all the time for a variety of interests, skill levels, and timeframes, including many that are tailored for the summer months. Check our search page often and you’ll always find something new!

Career Discovery Internship Program

SCA has partnered with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to provide over 50 internships for students from culturally and ethnically diverse backgrounds.

 

An SCA Intern tagging ducks at a US Fish and Wildlife Service National RefugeFWS Directorate Fellows Program

SCA is partnering with the US Fish and Wildlife Service to provide fellowship opportunities for rising seniors and recent graduates interested in a conservation career. Summer fellowships are available in a variety of fields, including biological sciences, natural resources, and refuge management.

News, Stories & Projects

A black footed ferret considers its new habitat.

by Lauren Kurtz, SCA intern for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge.

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Left: SCA intern and biology masters student Claire Ellwanger prepares for a field survey. Right: An eastern prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera leucophaea).
This post was written for Open Spaces, the official blog of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It’s part of a monthly series featuring SCA interns writing about their experiences working to promote, protect and study wildlife on public lands all over the United States.
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Most beach experiences involve sunshine, right? For humans, sure, but not for wildlife. The darkness of night provides the camouflage necessary for seven species of reptile to nest. All over the world for the past 120 million years, sea turtles have emerged from the ocean each spring and used the sand to hide and incubate their eggs.

The beach at Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is a place where people and shorebirds actively roam the surface in the daytime, and sea turtles plant future generations under the sand at night. It still feels like a dream to say that I am an SCA intern at one of the most productive sea turtle nesting habitats in the United States.

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This post was written for Open Spaces, the official blog of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It’s part of a monthly series featuring SCA interns writing about their experiences working to promote, protect and study wildlife on public lands all over the United States.
Read more

“I hop out of the truck, net in hand and wader boots pounding the ground. The chicks scatter in different directions to thwart me, but my attention is entirely focused on the farthest of the three. It runs freely above the sulfurous mud, and I follow with a galumphing stride. I start to close the gap and reach out my net, closer, closer… SCHLUMP!”

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