Every year, SCA provides training, tools and projects that place motivated teens and young adults in the field to effect changes great and small. How do we measure the effects? Sometimes its through decreased CO2 levels or by the tons of trash collected or in the number of trees planted. Our success is also measured by the lessons learned, the perspective gained and the lives we transform—today and into the future. Often when the SCA project is over, the success story is just beginning. Take a look at some of our most recent accomplishments.

Two good things in one app: find parks near you and support SCA! What more could you ask for?American Park Network, creator of Oh, Ranger!

When I walk outside these days, there’s a bluster in the air. It’s not often warm. Sometimes… I shiver.It wasn’t always like this. Just last month I could run around town in shorts. There was no chill, no shivering, only heat and sweat. Times have changed, and so has the weather.

Welcome to the Conservation Caption Competition, Fall 2012 Edition. Every second Monday between now and December 7, I’ll be posting a photo to Facebook and calling on you, gentle reader, to caption it.Captions are due by 5 PM Wednesday. The winning caption, as chosen by our designated caption quality evaluator, SCA intern Danielle Thompson, will be posted here and on Facebook Friday morning.

Above: Wolfweed Wetlands—San Bernard National Wildlife Refuge

I love the idea of working for a government environmental agency—National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, Texas Parks and Wildlife, etc.—so when I got offered a position with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, I was definitely happy. When I was told I would be working in Water Resources, I was ecstatic.

As my internship at Fire Island National Seashore comes to a close, I was lucky enough to have two “employee enrichment” days - or as I like to call them, field trips!

From the Mount Rainier National Park Volunteer Newsletter September 2012.
We would like to highlight a special intern this summer to help show how much the park relies on and appreciates our volunteers. The east side Backcountry Intern through the Student Conservation Association, Kris Youtz, was first on scene to an emergency call in the Glacier Basin area in the past month.

(Photo above) Cassin takes in the aroma of flowers grown from the compost he helped create. NPS photo.

The dogs in the Denali National Park kennels produce up to 50 pounds of poo a day. That’s the same weight as some of our sled dogs! In 1980, the kennels staff decided that launching all that poo down the hill behind the kennels building probably wasn’t the greatest idea.

(Photo above) Education Department: Summer 2012

As the summer season quickly comes to a close, everybody in the park can feel the shifting of gears.

It’s been less than a week since I left Dismal, but there are a few things that I miss, and a few things that have helped me settle into the abroad program I’m participating in this semester.

This past weekend, Hudson River Park hosted an educational event dubbed “Science on the River”. On Saturday, one of our piers was transformed into an environmental education extravaganza. Several organizations converged to educate the public on core sampling, fish of the Hudson River, benthic invertebrates, sponge parks, oysters, and we had an SCA table too!

(Photo above) The students ham it up for Dan, not that they don’t act like that on a regular basis!

Week II and the epic struggle against poison oak continues. Not to beat a dead horse, but poison oak seems to be a ruling factor in our lives right now. The first victim, our very own Richard (aka Lake aka Lagos aka Fuego) was the first to fall.

Well, today was it – my summer is officially over, and it seems a little bit surreal.

For one, the weeks absolutely flew by – but as I click through my previous posts, it’s obvious why the days rolled by so quickly.

So today, I tied up a bunch of loose ends, I sent in forms, signed papers, and packed up the camera the SCA so generously lent me for the summer.

(Photo above) Haute couture in the salt marshes

Through my internship I have had the opportunity to explore other ongoing projects at Fire Island National Seashore besides my own plant related work, and this has been a tremendous learning experience.

I would like to begin this post with a polite rescinding of all of the nice things I have ever said about greenbrier. Blackberries will always be a sworn enemy, but after this afternoon, the greenbrier has fallen out of my favor as well.

We got a slow start to the day, a bunch of refuge business fell out of the sky all at once.

This post was written by Emily Ramlow

After months of project planning and weeks of long days in the field, a stream restoration project is finally complete. Our work however, is just beginning. Every new site then needs to be monitored to create a historic log of data that will continue for about ten years and help improve future project designs.

This post was written by Lilly Stewart

I have spent a lot of time working on vegetation monitoring this summer. I find it helpful to imagine that I am journeying through the rainforests of South and Central America looking for the legendary city of El Dorado while searching for monitoring plots.

(Photo above) Gaiters, carhartts, and a tucked in shirt-check!

There’s an island out in Narragansett Bay. Recorded at over 200 acres, this island is uninhabited by humans.

(Photo above) Rain or shine, it’s easy to charge your phone!

First of all, I would like to give a shout out to all the lovely people working for all the vendors and brands I have contacted in the past few months that manage to go through the trouble of listening to or reading my oddly specific requests (Do you use USDA certified organic ingredients? Where are your grapefruits grown?

This week has been an interesting one. The intern and seasonal quarters have become eerily quiet with the departures, but the swamp has been getting a number of visiting scientists from a couple different government agencies.

The first to arrive was another hydrologist from the US Geological Survey.

(Photo above) Crew lunch on a Redwood log!

Time after time I am set loose into the wild with a group of high school students, confident in my ability to face the onslaught of weird possibilities and unending opportunities for catastrophe, ready to lead each crew to triumph and trail mastery. But as they say, the best intentions are fraught with disaster. Or do they say that?

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SCA Themes

Our 2015 Summer Roadtrip takes you to amazing places and member stories around the country.

75000 Members have served with SCA

Over 75,000 women and men have served with SCA - read some of their stories here.

Read about the women and men who helped build America’s oldest and largest youth conservation service organization here

Meet some of the amazing women who blazed a trail with SCA

Member Bloggers

Rachelle Hedges
San Mateo County Parks
See Posts by Rachelle Hedges
Sarika Khanwilkar
Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge
See Posts by Sarika Khanwilkar
Elizabeth Braatz
St. Croix Wetland Management District
See Posts by Elizabeth Braatz
Noah M. Schlager
National Trails Intermountain Region
See Posts by Noah M. Schlager
Dakota McCoy
Yosemite National Park
See Posts by Dakota McCoy

Staff Bloggers

Ann Pedtke
New York City
See posts by Ann Pedtke
Joseph Thurston
Washington, DC
See posts by Joseph Thurston

Alumni Stories

Where will SCA take you?

“Something different” is what Jessica Aronson Cook was looking for when she first joined the Student Conservation Association (SCA) as...
Mary Nghe and Stacey Kinney -- two CDIP Interns with the Student Conservation Association
Growing up in Houston, Stacey Kinney says she only saw ducks on office park ponds. Now, here she was at...

New findings on SCA's youth impact - read about the Search Institute's study

A new multi-year study on SCA’s youth impact shows significant gains across a wide range of indicators.
Read about the Study here »

Michelle Bobowick, Interning with SCA in Yellowstone National Park, 1985
It was 1958, when our family affair with the Student Conservation Association began. Since, then our family has continued its commitment to improving the world around us through SCA.
During the summer of ’69, twenty students arrived at Great Smokey Mountains National Park ready to clear windfall damage in...
When Student Conservation Association (SCA) supporter and 1983 alumnus, Bob Kachinski, was fresh out of college, he went on what...

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